Romantic Dodecahedrons

Posted: March 3, 2012 in Scribe Scribbles
Tags: , ,

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I don’t particularly care for romantic entanglements, they tend to be cruel to one party or another, and usually in books, the pairing I want to happen isn’t the one that the author writes out. Now, much to my consternation, I’m about to use one in what I’m working on. And in a galling and rather embarrassing turn of events, I’m actually liking the newer fellow that’s limped onto the triangle more than the fellow that I had planned to have end up with the girl.  Thankfully, this unwanted character has helped get rid of the writer’s hiccup and funk I’d fallen into. I suppose if I think of him as a plot device I won’t be so galled by the fact that I like him more. I’d tell you more but it’s complicated as to why a romantic third to the story helps. It has something to with a people who bond deeply with their family units, madness that can happen if one of these people is not bonded to a mate, and a prince who has no idea he’s been promised to a little wandering scarred desert dweller of a girl. He’s not exactly happy. Well, when things get going, its revealed that he’s in love with another girl.

It’s a romantic dodecahedron that’s building underneath the more important story. It’s not the story, but it is definitely sharpening some things.  What about you Scribes?

I can see nose wrinkling among the fellows all ready.

Ladies? Ever had a romantic complication pop up in your book that made the plot run faster and deeper? What about you non-nose wrinkling fellows?

By the way, the picture above is by Sir Laurence  Alma Tadema and is called “The Silent Greeting”. It’s another one of my favorites. And I’m hoping that like the picture above, there is some shades of the dodecahedron that show through, but only shades.

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Comments
  1. Yup! I have. It took me quite be surprise actually.

  2. Gee says:

    Romantic relationships are a staple in Dean Koontz’s books. I’m not sure whether they’re needed, but I suppose his female readers enjoy them; his books are always best-sellers, which suggests that both men and women are buying them. I hope that your heroine likes the man who’s meant for her.

Be brilliant, be peculiar, be peculiarly brilliant.

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